September 15, 2016

HOMILY FOR THE TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR C (SEPT 18)


HOMILY FOR THE TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR C (SEPT 18)

Ronald Stephens
Bishop of Holy Trinity Diocese and St. Andrew’s Cathedral Parish
The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Today’s readings all have something to do with wealth in terms of finances. The Gospel writer, Luke, of all the writers, has been the most active in talking about issues of poverty and wealth, and we have seen Jesus talking about this many times in the last few weeks as he moves onward toward his final destination. Jesus seems to find it imperative that this theme is repeated again and again, possibly because it was the cornerstone of his teaching.
It is very clear from the first reading that the prophet Amos does not hold rich businessmen in high regard, The rhetoric is a lot like that we are hearing today about Wall Street as the cause of all our financial woes. According to Amos, corrupt rich businessmen trample on the those who are needy, never taking their needs into consideration, but only trying to amass more and more wealth. This has also been a long-standing theme in the Old Testament – it was not new and unique to Jesus. Amos decries their putting wealth before all other considerations. Even if they do keep the Sabbath, for example, they can’t wait for it to end, to get back to the business of making money. Amos says they also use methods or tricks to make more money even – they fix the scales so people are getting less grain but they charge them more. They even sell the grain that falls on the floor along with the dirt. While Amos is quite aware of what they are doing, he makes one important point, however. God sees everything and he will not ever forget!
The Psalm today shows the opposite of this greed. It shows a God who will provide for the poor, lift them up out of the dust, and seat them at the heavenly table with princes. The poor will get their reward before the rich ever do!
Despite the criticisms in Paul’s time of the Roman government and how they too manage to oppress the poor and needy, Paul is quick to say that we need to pray for them, to ask God to awaken them to the “knowledge of the truth”. Paul sees the kind of sharing that was going on in Christian community as a role model for others in this regard.
Jesus attitude to the rich is not always consistent in the parables. Often he is criticizing the rich, but sometimes in the parables, they are saved. He praises those who have enough to give food to the apostles as they go from town to town. He praises Mary who uses expensive ointment on his body. He sometimes tells us that wealth and possessions can be a good thing.
In this tradition then, we have another parable today about wealth which is strikingly different. Luke saw that poverty and wealth were not black and white issues and that sometimes there was a lot of gray. This week’s Gospel and next week’s Gospel are really contrasting stories about wealth and poverty.
This week’s and next week’s Gospel both start with the sentence..”There was a rich man…” but the two parables will point out very different things. Today’s reading is directed at the disciples themselves and talks about how you can use riches constructively. After the parable itself ends, Luke has Jesus draw some conclusions about the meaning of it.
As I have talked to you before, we know that some people reading this parable are confused and some are even offended that Jesus would praise dishonesty.
The dishonest servant falsified documents almost as a bribe so that he would be helped by the people who profited from his falsification of accounts. He hoped that they would be hospitable to him after doctoring the bill of debts. In the Gospel of Matthew Jesus told his followers to be “wise as serpents” and this might be an illustration of that.
The dishonest servant used his brain – something we are not always allowed to do in organized religion. Because his disciples brought nothing with them, they would have to use their brains to make sure they were taken care of. It is not the dishonesty Jesus is praising but the cleverness of the servant to make sure he would be provided for.
After the parable, we have a number of somewhat unrelated statements about wealth, some of which don’t really seem to apply to the parable itself. But some do.
For example, Jesus says that he would trust the one who took care of the little financial things each day to take charge of the larger account. “Whoever is faithful in very little is faithful also in much.”
How does this apply to us? Well, perhaps we need to start taking care of and noticing the little things each day, those small opportunities that get us ready for larger issues. Those who give a beggar a dollar, who write a friendly email, who visit a sick friend, who vote when it is time, who share a meal with a neighbor, who read a story to a child won’t have time or inclination to create a life driven by the almighty dollar. Luke finishes by saying that we can’t serve both God and money. What God asks us to do – to love our neighbor – doesn’t take great wealth. But it does take thinking about another, looking for those opportunities when they arise in order to best prepare for the future – our eternal reward. And isn’t this very Good News for us all?  God bless.
https://fatherronstephens.wordpress.com/

HOMILY FOR THE TWENTY-FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR C (SEPT 18)

Ronald Stephens
Bishop of Holy Trinity Diocese and St. Andrew’s Cathedral Parish
The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA

Today’s readings all have something to do with wealth in terms of finances. The Gospel writer, Luke, of all the writers, has been the most active in talking about issues of poverty and wealth, and we have seen Jesus talking about this many times in the last few weeks as he moves onward toward his final destination. Jesus seems to find it imperative that this theme is repeated again and again, possibly because it was the cornerstone of his teaching.
It is very clear from the first reading that the prophet Amos does not hold rich businessmen in high regard, The rhetoric is a lot like that we are hearing today about Wall Street as the cause of all our financial woes. According to Amos, corrupt rich businessmen trample on the those who are needy, never taking their needs into consideration, but only trying to amass more and more wealth. This has also been a long-standing theme in the Old Testament – it was not new and unique to Jesus. Amos decries their putting wealth before all other considerations. Even if they do keep the Sabbath, for example, they can’t wait for it to end, to get back to the business of making money. Amos says they also use methods or tricks to make more money even – they fix the scales so people are getting less grain but they charge them more. They even sell the grain that falls on the floor along with the dirt. While Amos is quite aware of what they are doing, he makes one important point, however. God sees everything and he will not ever forget!
The Psalm today shows the opposite of this greed. It shows a God who will provide for the poor, lift them up out of the dust, and seat them at the heavenly table with princes. The poor will get their reward before the rich ever do!
Despite the criticisms in Paul’s time of the Roman government and how they too manage to oppress the poor and needy, Paul is quick to say that we need to pray for them, to ask God to awaken them to the “knowledge of the truth”. Paul sees the kind of sharing that was going on in Christian community as a role model for others in this regard.
Jesus attitude to the rich is not always consistent in the parables. Often he is criticizing the rich, but sometimes in the parables, they are saved. He praises those who have enough to give food to the apostles as they go from town to town. He praises Mary who uses expensive ointment on his body. He sometimes tells us that wealth and possessions can be a good thing.
In this tradition then, we have another parable today about wealth which is strikingly different. Luke saw that poverty and wealth were not black and white issues and that sometimes there was a lot of gray. This week’s Gospel and next week’s Gospel are really contrasting stories about wealth and poverty.
This week’s and next week’s Gospel both start with the sentence..”There was a rich man…” but the two parables will point out very different things. Today’s reading is directed at the disciples themselves and talks about how you can use riches constructively. After the parable itself ends, Luke has Jesus draw some conclusions about the meaning of it.
As I have talked to you before, we know that some people reading this parable are confused and some are even offended that Jesus would praise dishonesty.
The dishonest servant falsified documents almost as a bribe so that he would be helped by the people who profited from his falsification of accounts. He hoped that they would be hospitable to him after doctoring the bill of debts. In the Gospel of Matthew Jesus told his followers to be “wise as serpents” and this might be an illustration of that.
The dishonest servant used his brain – something we are not always allowed to do in organized religion. Because his disciples brought nothing with them, they would have to use their brains to make sure they were taken care of. It is not the dishonesty Jesus is praising but the cleverness of the servant to make sure he would be provided for.
After the parable, we have a number of somewhat unrelated statements about wealth, some of which don’t really seem to apply to the parable itself. But some do.
For example, Jesus says that he would trust the one who took care of the little financial things each day to take charge of the larger account. “Whoever is faithful in very little is faithful also in much.”
How does this apply to us? Well, perhaps we need to start taking care of and noticing the little things each day, those small opportunities that get us ready for larger issues. Those who give a beggar a dollar, who write a friendly email, who visit a sick friend, who vote when it is time, who share a meal with a neighbor, who read a story to a child won’t have time or inclination to create a life driven by the almighty dollar. Luke finishes by saying that we can’t serve both God and money. What God asks us to do – to love our neighbor – doesn’t take great wealth. But it does take thinking about another, looking for those opportunities when they arise in order to best prepare for the future – our eternal reward. And isn’t this very Good News for us all?  God bless.